butterfly logo
Home |About Us |Links |Mailing List |Newsletter Info |Newsletter |Order Information  |Policy/Privacy |Site Map
Vintage Aprons |Avon |Bells |California Pottery |Vintage Crochet |Vintage Embroidery |Enesco |Ephemera
Glassware |Hallmark |Haviland Limoges |Holidays |Lefton |Limited Editions |Made in Japan |McCoy |Miniatures
Miscellaneous Porcelain |Miscellaneous Pottery |Promo Glassware |Stone Critters |Tom Clark Gnomes
|Toys and Dolls|


Review Cart Check Out


ARCHIVES

flowerbar

CHINTZ


flowerbar



Vol. 3 Issue 5



Chintz porcelain pieces have become very popular to the collector in the last 10-15 years. It is easily distinguished by its allover floral designs. It was first produced in Stoke-on-Trent in England in the late 1800's and is reminiscent of the chintz fabric.

The older patterns tend to be larger, while the newer patterns are smaller and more intricate. Engravers would engrave copper plates that would then create an image on paper. That image would be transferred on the piece by rubbing it with a stiff brush. The paper was then washed off, leaving a design on the ceramic piece. In the pre-1860's, the design that was left was only one color, leaving only an outline. The colors of each individual flower then had to be painted by hand. In the mid-1860's a new process was devised; lithographic printing. It was a cheaper process and the colors were truer to the flowers natural colors. Leonard Grimwade of Grimwades, Ltd. was one of the men who produced a paper for lithographs. They developed a paper strong enough to go through the process that left a thin layer on top that would be detached and was able to be applied to curved areas of the ceramic pieces. The lithograph process has been used since 1928 to produce Chintz patterns.

There were many manufacturers of chintz. The most widely known that produced the most chintz patterns was Royal Winton. The same pattern can be found by more than one manufacturer. The names may be different, but will be the same pattern from another manufacturer.

After WWII, some importers from Czechoslovakia made chintz and imported them to the U.S. There is also some Japanese chintz. They are copies of English patterns that were handpainted by the Japanese and imported to the U.S. They were usually sold in five and dime stores.


MANUFACTURERS

Royal Winton
1886 - Present
Earthenware
Stoke
First chintz lithograph produced by Royal Winton in 1928, named "Marguerite".

James Kent
1896 - Present
China and Earthenware
Longton
Began as James Kent, Ltd., in Longton. The trade name "Old Foley" was used until 1986 when it was purchased by Fleshpots, Ltd. when it was renamed "James Kent, Limited" using the trade names "James Kent, Old Foley, Fleshpots, and Foley"

Lord Nelson
1889 - 1981
Earthenware
Hanley
Trade name by Elijah Cotton, Ltd., Nelson Pottery, and Hanley. The Pottery Gazzette an ad proclaimed Nelson ware as being known for its high quality breakfast, tea and dinnerware, coffee, supper, and fruit sets.

Shelley
1872 - 1966
China and Earthenware
Longton
Shelley was initially known as Wileman and Co. In 1925, the name was changed to Shelley Potteries, Ltd. Allied English Potteries acquired Shelley Co. Allied English Potteries merged with the Doulton groups in 1971.

Crown Ducal
1915 - 1967
Earthenware
Tunstall
The trade name used by A.G. Richardson & Co., Ltd. It was acquired by Enoch Wedgwood & Co., Ltd., Tunstall, Staffordshire Potteries.

Empire
1896 -1967
Earthenware
Stoke
Trade name Empire Porcelain Co., Ltd.

Rosina China Co., Ltd.
1941 - Present
China
Longton

W. R. Midwinter Ltd.
1910 - Present
Earthenware and Ironstone
Burslem
Established at Bournes Park Pottery, Burslem

Arthur J.Wilkinson, Ltd
1885 -1964
Earthenware and Ironstone
Burslem

Sadler & Sons
1882 - Present
Earthenware
Burslem
Has been primarily a producer of teapots

Barker Bros.,Ltd.
1876 - 1978
China and Earthenware
Meir Works, Longton
Became part of Alfred Clough group in 1959, then Grindley of Stoke, Ltd. in 1978.

Wade, Heath, & Co.(Ltd)
1927 - Present
Earthenware
Burslem
Part of the Wade Group of Potters or Wade Ceramics, Ltd.

Ridgway, Ltd.
1910 - 1952
Earthenware
Shelton
Built in Shelton by Edward John Ridgway in 1866. Taken over by Royal Doulton

Hollinshead & Kirkham, Ltd.
1870 - 1956
Earthenware
Tunstall
Johnson Bros., Ltd. purchased the factory in 1956.

Sampson Smith, Ltd.
1846 - 1963
Earthenware and China
Longton

Crown Clarence
1922 - 1946
Earthenware
Longton
Trade name used by Operative Wholesale Society, Ltd.

Colclough China, Ltd.
1937 - 1948
China
Longton
Taken over by Royal Doulton

Kensington Pottery
1922 - 1937
Earthenware
Hanley

John Shaw & Sons, Ltd
1931 -1963
China and Earthenware
Longton
Adderlys, Ltd.
1905 - 1947
China and Earthenware
Longton
Taken over by Ridgway Potteries, Ltd. in 1947

Thomas Hughes & Son, Ltd.
1895 - 1957
China and Earthenware
Burslem
Taken overby Arthur Wood & Sons in 1961

E.R. Phila
1886 - Present Porcelain
Czechoslovakia


MARKS

For some examples of Chintz: Susan Scott's ChintzNet Click Here
Edish Click Here


RESOURCES:

Chintz Ceramics by Jo Anne P. Welsh
Schroeder's Antiques Price Guide - 18th Edition
Susan Scott's ChintzNet
Edish


The next Nancy's Antiques & Collectibles Newsletter will feature German Porcelain.



flowerbar


Questions? Email Us!


mailbox


flowerbar

SIGN UP HERE!

Join Our Mailing List

Get on our FREE Newsletter

Mailing List!

flower bar


USA-Epay Logo

ACCEPTED!
Credit Card Payment Processing


Official PayPal Seal


Back To Top

Home Button

Home |About Us |Order Information |Policy/Privacy |Mailing List |Newsletter Info |Newsletter |Site Map
|Links|